• Values are purposeful. Your values shouldn’t be a list of generic ideals. They should be specific to your company, and they should align with your company’s goals. For instance, while a commitment to justice might make little sense for a tech company, a commitment to privacy would serve an important purpose.
  • Values are choices. Rather than seeing your values as beliefs, treat them like choices. After all, most companies will say they believe that customer service is important. What differentiates your company from others will be the choices you make in the name of customer service. That could mean committing to a 24-hour response time for email inquiries and investing in the staff and tools to make that possible.
  • Values will cost you. Like any choice, values come with an inherent cost. Make sure you are ready to uphold your company’s core values even when it would be easier or less expensive to ignore them. If your company claims a commitment to sustainability, you should use eco-friendly materials even if that decision cuts into your profits. Values that cost you nothing aren’t worth having.
  • Values require action. Beliefs without action are just empty words. For instance, if you say your company values innovation, you can’t stifle employees with a “this is how it’s always been done” mentality. Instead, you should be actively encouraging and considering new ideas.
  • Values are timeless. Although your company’s practices and strategies may change over time, your core values should be constant. Choose values you can... (More)